Monday, February 1, 2016

Have you Upload FCRA Financials to your NGO Website?

One of the major changes notified in the Amendments Rules 2015 is that now every NGO has to upload FCRA Financials to their websites within 9 months of year end. So the time limit is 31st December to upload FCRA financials to your NGO Website. In the same clause another amendment is to upload quarterly FCRA receipts within 15 days of the quarter end. Let us discuss this in detail.

A. Upload FCRA Financials (Annually)

Q1 : What should be upload?

A1 : Receipts and Payments Account (FC Funds), Income and Expenditure Accounts (FC Funds), Balance Sheet (FC Funds) and all the annexures.

Q2 : Is it Audited Statements?

A2 : Yes, all statements must be audited by chartered accountant.

Q3 : What is recommended format?

A3 : No format is recommended by FCRA department. It is preferable to have in PDF format.

Q4 : Where it should be upload?

A4 : NGO’s official website.

Q5 : What is the deadline?

A5 : After 9 months of Financial Year ends. i.e. 31st December.

Q6 : From which year it should be upload?

A6 : Upload Financial Statements of 2014-15 immediately.

B. Upload Details of FC receipts (Quarterly)

Q1 : What should be upload?

A1 : Details of Donors, Amount Received and Date of Receipt.

Q2 : Is it Audited ?

A2 : No, only details to be uploaded.

Q3 : What is recommended format?

A3 : No format is recommended by FCRA department. It is preferable to have in PDF format.

Q4 : Where it should be upload?

A4 : As per the rule 13(b) of amendments 2015, It should be upload to NGO’s official website or website specified by the Central Government. (However no such website is specified by the Government yet, so preferable is to upload to NGO’s website right now)

Q5 : What is the deadline?

A5 : 15 Days after the end of the quarter.

· Quarters
· April to June
· July to September
· October to December
· January to March

· Deadlines
· 15th July
· 15th October
· 15th January
· 15th April
Q6 : From which Quarter it should be upload?

A6 : As per my opinion, NGO has to upload for three quarters of FY 2015-16 ending on 30 Jun, 30 Sept and 31 Dec immediately.

C.What if NGO do not have website

If the NGOs do not have website, then it should get one. As the cost of creating and maintaining website is bit higher, I recommended to use below free tools / website :

http://www.beep.com

https://wordpress.com

https://www.blogger.com

Monday, January 25, 2016

Verify your FCRA status

Please Specify the FCRA Registration Number, State, and District

https://fcraonline.nic.in/Dta_col_frm_tngq_valid.aspx

FCRA Online services

How to file FCRA Renewal form - FC3

Is Corporate India doing enough?

Corporate Social Responsibility is not a new concept in India. Ever since their inception, corporates like the Tata Group, the Aditya Birla Group, the Wipro and the Infosys, to name a few prominent ones, have been involved in serving the community. Through donations and charity events, many other companies have been doing their part for society.

However, CSR has been taken more seriously in India after the Corporate Social Responsibility law came into effect in April 2014. Propelled by this impetus, a lot of good work for social causes is being done by Corporate India with CSR finding a permanent place in approximately 16,000 company boardrooms.

But there is a flipside to the story as well. A reality check done by Bureaucracy Today reveals that there is a lack of awareness of CSR guidelines among many corporates. Several top corporate honchos cutting across sectors are performing tasks which do not come under the CSR guidelines.

Another disturbing trend is the apparent partiality shown by many corporates in their CSR spending towards the States that have low industrial and business activity. It is seen that a majority of the companies opened their purse strings for the States that already have a sizeable corporate presence such as Maharashtra, Gujarat, Delhi, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh. The backward areas of India like the Northeastern States and the Union Territories of Lakshadweep, Daman and Diu, Andaman and Nicobar Islands and Dadra and Nagar Haveli where social and economic development is most needed are witnessing little CSR spending.

Another aspect of the entire issue is the mushrooming of NGOs. The Government's suggested CSR activities include measures to eradicate hunger, promote education, environmental sustainability and rural sports, protect national heritage and make contributions to the Prime Minister's National relief fund. As per the guidelines, a company can perform these CSR tasks either on its own through its non-profit foundation or through independently registered non-profit organizations. This provision in the CSR law has led to a boom in the number of NGOs in India. As such, it raises a genuine doubt about the credibility and intention of many NGOs. According to a media report, there are over two million operational NGOs in India. Choosing the right one from such a large number of NGOs is not an easy task.

Our Cover Story in this CSR-Special Edition attempts to bring to light the gaps in corporate CSR activities in India while highlighting the extraordinary social tasks performed by Corporate India which are bringing smiles to the faces of thousands of underprivileged people. At the same time, it also raises a pertinent question – why should not the Government put in place an effective monitoring mechanism to ensure compliance with the guidelines and see to it that CSR spendings are done judiciously without any bias by companies? Monitoring CSR spendings will make the entire effort a tangible reality rather than an exercise just for the heck of it.

Source: https://bureaucracytoday.com/editor_spk.aspx?id=10067

Odisha finance minister suggests state-level CSR body

BHUBANESWAR: Finance minister Pradip Amat on Friday asked corporates to adjust their corporate social responsibility (CSR) works in sync with the state government priorities under a state-level CSR-body.

Speaking at an event, Inclusive India Forum 2016, at Xavier Institute of Management Bhubaneswar (XIMB), Amat said "Odisha can gain if corporates working in the state work together on identified priority sectors together with the state government. This has to be done through formation of a state level CSR body that could lay the roadmap for such expenditure," he said.


District level CSR monitoring and evaluation needs to be taken up to see that there is no undue delay, he said.

CSR expenditure, now mandated by the central government can bring in large scale changes in several development parameters that are vital for sustainable development, Amat said.

The CSR regulations have provided much more than a portion of corporate budget for community development. It is an opportunity for companies to harness their captive resources and talent pool for effective stakeholder engagement. It has to be a strategic function that can provide social benefit and competitive advantage at the same time, he said.

The focus of the forum, organized by Harvard Business School Club of India (alumni of HBS in India) and XIMB, was is to discuss and debate on how to scale the social impact of CSR initiatives- particularly in the field of education, healthcare and livelihoods, the organizers said.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bhubaneswar/Odisha-finance-minister-suggests-state-level-CSR-body/articleshow/50683348.cms



Milton Charitable Foundation for the Visually Handicapped invites applications for Job Skill Training of differentabled youth from February 2016 onwards.

Milton Charitable Foundation for the Visually Handicapped invites applications for Job Skill Training of differentabled youth from February 2016 onwards.

Course Duration – 6 Months

Eligibility – The candidates should have more than 40% of disability and most have completed 12th standard or above with minimum 50% of marks. They most have the minimum ability of understanding & writing English.

Course Overview – The candidates who will be enrolled in this programme they will be imparted regular training classes on General knowledge, banking awareness, Mathematics & Reasoning attitude, communicative skill & computer attitude and standardized computer application related to various jobs throughout the six month training programme. The candidates from both the local and remote areas are allowed. Boarding & fooding accommodation will be provided if required by the candidate. 

The interested candidates may send their Bio-data and Resume through E-mail – mcfvhodisha@gmail.com, helpdesk@mcfvh.org by 31st January 2016.

Job- Ward Boy, Bhubaneswar, Odisha


State employment mission, Puri


State employment Mission, Debgorh, Odisha


Tender Call Notice


Expression of Interest, Brahmapur, Ganjam, Odisha


Expression of Interest- Talcher, Anugul Dt. Odisha


Invitation for expression of interest (EOI) Keonjhar, Odiah


National awards


Applications are invited from Interested NGOs for establishing ITIs


Thursday, January 7, 2016

Linking CSR with business practices

CSR in India has been detached from business practices. A more effective approach to CSR would entail efforts to integrate sustainable business with societal giving, rather than simply requiring companies to donate money and outsource all of its CSR efforts.

Over the last two decades, Indian companies have grown and become globally competitive. However, social and economic inclusion has not paralleled economic growth.

Both the previous and present government have seen the private sector as critical to the future prosperity of the country and its citizens. In this context, the 2013 Companies Act is a push for companies to develop and expand their corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs.

The role of private capital in shaping society is undeniable. However a law requiring corporates to be more mindful of their impact has raised a public debate about social priorities, and the great potential of CSR to foster the energy, talent, and resources of India’s robust corporate sector to improve the lives of all Indians.

India’s approach to, and definition of, CSR are quite distinct from most other countries. In various parts of the world, CSR is intertwined with sustainable and responsible business practices as well as social work efforts. CSR in India currently takes a philanthropy centered and number-centric approach, focused on output rather than strategic outcomes. In India, CSR is detached from business practices. This divide, created by the Ministry of Corporate Affairs in the hope of avoiding brand marketing or corporate perks, has forced CSR boards to keep charity efforts separate from a corporate’s expertise.

While CSR efforts ultimately create a net positive result, the current discussion revolves around whether the law is written in a way that promotes the most impactful processes and long lasting results and, if not, how the law can be reworked.

The potential of CSR lies in harnessing the particular strengths of a company to integrate sustainable business with societal giving, rather than simply requiring the company to donate money and outsource all of its CSR efforts.

The strict definition of CSR in the Act emphasizes the involvement of corporates with certain types of social causes in partnership with NGOs. Health and education have gained a tremendous amount of support and funding, while relatively more controversial and non-traditional causes have received less assistance. The narrow definition and the even narrower efforts made by many companies only address specific needs rather than nurturing civil society more generally. Furthermore, government-backed programs are benefiting from corporate giving, as many companies have tailored their CSR programs to fit in with governmental goals. While CSR in any form is beneficial, the CSR scale in India is tipped in favor of conventional causes and away from social innovation.

Whatever the causes, the government suggests that companies partner with NGOs to help in their CSR efforts. With screenings and field visits, NGOs are at the mercy of corporates who choose these partnerships. Corporates are looking for NGOs that possess capacity, knowledge, and resources, and will be able to handle their strict requirements of project monitoring and reporting. This means that large NGOs have been accumulating more partnerships, while corporate support tends to stay away from smaller NGOs. The big get bigger while the small are starved of resources, which reduces the range of new ideas and policies being developed.

While NGOs provide an established framework and infrastructure for companies to build their CSR efforts upon, the cost of compliance raises the question: why should companies bother to comply with the law? Creating a CSR committee, reporting CSR activity annually in a specified format, creating an internal CSR structure, using third parties such as law firms or CSR consultancy firms, and complying with other aspects of the law, all add up to a significant effort. These hurdles detract attention from where it truly should be directed: socially responsible practices.

Moreover, the Act stipulates no penalty for non-compliance with regard to spending 2% of a company’s profits on CSR. The reasons to comply are then only a willingness to obey the law and the pressure to comply that is created by consumers and other companies.

As the first country in the world to legally mandate CSR, India does not have an existing model to follow or successful example to emulate. There is, however, scope for continued discussion and reform. After only one fiscal year, we saw trends in the CSR environment and recognized the potential impact that could be made; what is less certain is whether that potential will become reality.

If the 2013 Companies Act is effective, social spending will continue increasing, corporates will steadily play a larger role in CSR efforts, and the standard of living of the neediest will improve. However, corporate giving cannot be a substitute for effective governance.

Source: http://www.gatewayhouse.in/linking-csr-with-business-practices

Linking businesses and NGOs for CSR

The Ministry of Corporate Affairs’ notice last year directing companies to partner with NGOs for their CSR efforts requires companies to choose partners carefully, while NGOs must focus on monitoring and other requirements—so both sides are trying to address gaps and work with each other’s strengths

The interaction between Indian corporations and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) increased after the Indian Companies Act of 2013 was passed. In a notice published by the Ministry of Corporate Affairs, companies were directed to work with partners (specifically, NGOs) who have “an established track record of three years in undertaking similar programs or projects.”

The CSR departments of some large companies have, since then, reportedly received a tremendous influx of appeals from NGOs for partnerships. However, companies have to choose partners wisely in order to ensure that their money is well spent.

The process of choosing an NGO partner typically involves a screening process. This can include a credibility test, a field visit, and background checks. It may also involve using the expertise of a CSR consulting firm. Many companies require NGOs to sign a memorandum of understanding (MoU) before entering into a partnership, and they also require monthly or annual impact assessment reports from the NGO. While these activities are essential to ensure that the NGO is reputable, it is also a financial burden for the companies as well as the NGOs. To avoid these additional costs, many companies involved in partnerships prior to the Act are simply strengthening those existing ties.

An important concern for companies is finding an organisation that has the appropriate amount of resources, knowledge, and capacity. As the Act pertains to large corporations, it follows that they are primarily looking to match up with large NGOs that fit this description. Working with reputable NGOs eliminates the worry of malpractice, while also providing a way to channel the majority of their funds and efforts.

What are the implications of this change for NGOs? Companies are demanding high standards from NGOs, especially in project monitoring. This means NGOs may have to devote more time to monitoring their projects rather than carrying them out. A Yes Bank CSR representative points out: “NGOs…don’t have the capacity or the priority to communicate and provide reporting to all the corporates that support them.” Their work is thus either diluted, or NGOs with limited human resources are not able to gain the credibility needed to hold on to partnerships. A CSR representative from Hindustan Petroleum points out that this limits the ability of grassroots organisations to gain momentum since they are not able to scale up or gain the requisite experience.

The choice companies have to make of whether to focus CSR efforts on output or outcome adds tension to the relationship. Output focuses on numbers: it is what companies put in their brochures to advertise the amount of people reached. Outcome is the long-term and lasting change created. Based on our analysis of nearly 200 companies, corporations are trending towards a focus on output rather than outcome.

In order to shift the focus, corporations and NGOs must work more collaboratively. To do so, corporates could increase the quantum of employee engagement in CSR efforts. The GMR Varalakshmi Foundation, for example, added employee’s CSR involvement to their performance reports. So far, however, this has not been a focus for most companies.

Increasing the role employees play in CSR efforts will ingrain the value of social responsibility in the company rather than it being treated as a separate unit. It will also allow for an exchange of skills between corporates and NGOs. Working with each other’s strengths and fostering a sense of shared responsibility can shift the focus to outcome rather than output.

Source: http://www.gatewayhouse.in/linking-businesses-and-ngos-for-csr

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Online FC return filing date extended

The last date for filing of FC return online in Form FC-4 has been extended to 15-March-2016 for the financial year 2014-15.

Ref: https://fcraonline.nic.in/home/PDF_Doc/Annual_Return_Extension.pdf

Annual Return filing date extended to 15th March 2016

Vide a notice of 22nd December 2015, FCRA Dept has extended filling date of Annual Return (now under FC4) to 15th March 2016.

This has been done to allow FCRA users to become used to new rules as well as to allow time to stabilise to new online website. At: https://fcraonline.nic.in/home/PDF_Doc/Annual_Return_Extension.pdf

Changes in online FC4 Form (Annual Return)
In addition, it is observed that now Investment in Fixed Deposit has been disabled under Utilisation column. So investment in FDs would not be treated as Utilisation. This was pointed by several persons that how one could treat investment in FDs as Utilisation, and was causing a lot of confusion.

This indicates that the form is currently being debugged and possibly the reason for extending the annual return filing date.

Changes to FCRA enables government to receive account details of NGOs instantly

NEW DELHI: Recent changes to the Foreign Contribution Regulation Rules (FCRA) empower the government to get details instantly about the accounts of non-governmental organisations whenever they receive foreign contributions or utilise the money. According to the home ministry: "All FCRA designated bank accounts and utilisation accounts will have to be brought on the online platforms of Public Finance Management Services ( PFMS) of the Ministry of Finance."

This means the bank accounts of any NGO registered under FCRA can be easily inspected by authorities under the home ministry. This will not only allow them track the funds disbursed, but also maintain a vigil, said officials.

As per the new amendments, the guidelines for reporting by banks have been tightened. "The banks shall report to the central government within 48 hours any transaction in respect of receipt of any foreign contribution," a home ministry notification said.

NGOs will be required to publish details of foreign contributions received on a quarterly basis on their websites or a website as specified by the government. This should be done within 15 days of the end of the quarter, and the reports should clearly show details of the donors, amount received and the date of receipt. According to government officials, the simplified online services will not only help reduce corruption but also allow maintaining a database of genuine NGOs.

The new rules make it easier for NGOs to file applications for registration, prior permission and renewal of registration under FCRA online and pay fees through a payment gateway.

Source: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/changes-to-fcra-enables-government-to-receive-account-details-of-ngos-instantly/articleshow/50346914.cms

Monday, December 21, 2015

FCRA Annual Return in New Form FC-4

The form of annual return has been changed to form FC-4. You must now file this form instead of form FC-6. All the attachments will also be uploaded online.

This does not apply to NGOs who have already filed their form FC-6 for 14-15 online. It also does not apply to those who have mailed their manually filled form by 14-Dec-15.

Ref:

1. Amendment to FCRA Rules 2015: https://fcraonline.nic.in/home/PDF_Doc/doc00600120151214130739.pdf

2. Link for logging in and Annual Return in FC-4 https://fcraonline.nic.in/fc_public_login.aspx?Resp_Id=4

Fees for Renewal Application in FC-3

FCRA Department has banked renewal fee drafts of 2285 NGOs (see list). These NGOs neede not pay the renewal fees of Rs. 500 online. All other NGOs applying for online renewal must pay this fees online.

What about NGOs who had enclosed the drafts? In most cases, FCRA department has not encashed the drafts. These are now being sent back to you by post. You can deposit them back in your bank account and get a refund.

Ref:

1. Announcement regarding FCRA renewal https://fcraonline.nic.in/home/PDF_Doc/merged.pdf

2. List of NGOs who need not pay renewal fees again: https://fcraonline.nic.in/home/pdf_doc/associations.pdf

FCRA Renewal Application - Date Extended

FCRA renewal has now moved online. If your FCRA registration is expiring on 30-Apr-16, then you must apply online in new form FC-3. Last date for filing the application is 15-Mar-2016.

This must be done even if you have already applied earlier using paper form FC-5.

Ref:

1. Announcement for extending deadline https://fcraonline.nic.in/home/PDF_Doc/merged.pdf

2. Link for logging in and filing FC-3 for renewal https://fcraonline.nic.in/fc_public_login.aspx?Resp_Id=1

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Registration process of NGOs goes online

The government on Monday put the entire registration process of NGOs for receiving foreign funds online.

Home Minister Rajnath Singh said all services offered under Foreign Contribution Regulation Act, 2010 are made online, reducing human interface to minimum.

Mr. Singh, who launched the revamped website of the foreigners division of his Ministry, hoped the new initiative will offer applicants the seamless services of FCRA with adequate ease and facilitation.

Simultaneously, the amended rules (Foreign Contribution (Regulation) Rules, 2015) are also being notified.

All kinds of application forms can now be filled online, documents can be uploaded online and even payment of fee etc. can be made online.

All types of queries and replies to the applicants will be made through emails. Even digitally signed registration certificates, prior permission sanctions will be issued to the applicants through emails.

The main changes are: applications for registration, prior permission and renewal of registration under FCRA, 2010 will be accepted online, all documents with the application will be uploaded online, all intimations will be required under FCRA, 2010, including annual returns accepted online.

Fee for various services will be paid through payment gateway, the condition of applying for renewal one year before the expiry of existing registration certificate for associations implementing multi-year project is removed.

To make the receipt and utilisation of foreign contribution by association transparent, associations are required to place the annual returns and such data quarterly on their website or website as prescribed by the Central Government.

Keywords: FCRA, Home Ministry

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/registration-process-of-ngos-goes-online/article7987878.ece?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=RSS_Syndication



Foreign Contributions Regulations Act services for NGOs go online

The government has also reduced the number of application forms from 10 to 6 and removed the condition of applying for renewal of FCRA licence.

Non-governmental organisations (NGOs), which have faced strong scrutiny from the Narendra Modi government, finally have some good news as the ministry of home affairs (MHA) on Monday rolled out the Foreign Contribution Regulation Rules (FCRR), 2015 that will make all the services of FCRA online, reducing human interface to zero.

Home minister Rajnath Singh launched the revamped website that will cater to NGOs seeking FCRA licences.

Under the new rules, applications for registration, prior permission and renewal of registration under Foreign Contributions Regulations Act (FCRA), 2010 will be accepted online and fee for the services will be paid through payment gateway.

The home ministry as first reported by ET on October 3 has also set a three-month deadline for the Intelligence Bureau (IB) to submit its verification report else it will be deemed to be taken. IB can formally request MHA in select cases if its need more time.

The government has also reduced the number of application forms from 10 to 6 and removed the condition of applying for renewal of FCRA licence one year before the expiry of existing registration certificate for associations implementing multi-year project.

According to home ministry officials, this will also bring down corruption and help to maintain the database of NGOs which are engaged in genuine work. NGOs which do not receive any foreign contribution for an entire year will not be required to submit a certificate from chartered accountant with annual return. Earlier, all NGOs whether they received foreign funding or not were required to submit a certificate from the CA.

The new rules do not require giving information regarding Facebook pages, Twitter handle and other personal details of the office bearer of the donor/receiver organisation. As per the new norms, declaration, undertaking in the application for registration, prior permission, renewal in annual returns have been simplified.

Source: http://tech.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/internet/foreign-contributions-regulations-act-services-for-ngos-go-online/50180630

Important Notice By MHA For Renewal Of FCRA Registration For NGOs

According to the circular, all applicants seeking renewal, including those who have submitted application in old Form, may apply fresh for grant of renewal of registration

In continuation to the circular announced in August by the Ministry of Home Affairs, wherein online processing of FCRA services was announced compulsory, further expediency in the process is expected to be generated with the latest circular of 14th December, 2015. According to the circular, all applicants seeking renewal, including those who have submitted application in old Form, may apply fresh for grant of renewal of registration under FCRA, 2010, and the requisite pay can be made through payment gateway. Complete online payment for renewal of FCRA registration takes us one step ahead in digitalizing administrative services for a smoother functioning. It must be noted that those who have previously sent in Demand Drafts for payment, need not repay. The circular has the name of those organizations whose payment has already been credited in the Government account. For the rest, the demand draft will be returned by post.

Some of the highlights of the circular are:

· The Entire Process Of Applying For Registration/Renewal And Even Prior Permission Has Been Made Online Which Is Not Only Easy To Apply But Also Enables You To Track The Status Of Your Application

· As Required Documents Can Now Be Scanned And Uploaded Directly To The FCRA Website, NGOs No Longer Have To Make Copies And Post Them To The Ministry

· The FCRA Fee Can Now Be Paid Online Which Further Reduces The Manual Process Of Sending Demand Drafts

· The FCRA Certificate/Prior Permission Will Be Issued Online Using A Digitally Signed Document Which Will Also Help NGOs To Quickly Get Through The Registration Process

· FCRA-Registered NGOs Have To Submit Details Of The Foreign Contributions Once In 3 Months

· List Of Purposes, The Number Of Documents And The Social Media Details Of Donors And NGOs Have Also Been Reduced.

Please visit the website https://fcraonline.nic.in for renewal of FCRA registration to be made afresh online. The last date for filing of renewal application has been extended to 15.03.2016.

Source: http://www.ngobox.org/full-news_Important-Notice-by-MHA-for-Renewal-of-FCRA-Registration-for-NGOs-NGOBOX_6515

FCRA Services for NGOs Go Online

EASING PROCESS Home minister Rajnath Singh launches revamped site that will cater to NGOs seeking FCRA licences, registration

Non-governmental organisations (NGOs), which have faced strong scrutiny from the Narendra Modi government, finally have some good news as the ministry of home affairs (MHA) on Monday rolled out the Foreign Contribution Regulation Rules (FCRR), 2015 that will make all the services of FCRA online, reducing human interface to zero. Home minister Rajnath Singh launched the revamped website that will cater to NGOs seeking FCRA licences.

Under the new rules, applications for registration, prior permission and renewal of registration under Foreign Contributions Regulations Act (FCRA), 2010 will be accepted online and fee for the services will be paid through payment gateway.

The home ministry as first reported by ET on October 3 has also set a three-month deadline for the Intelligence Bureau (IB) to submit its verification report else it will be deemed to be taken. IB can formally request MHA in select cases if its need more time.

The government has also reduced the number of application forms from 10 to 6 and removed the condition of applying for renewal of FCRA licence one year before the expiry of existing registration certificate for associations implementing multi-year project. According to home ministry officials, this will also bring down corruption and help to maintain the database of NGOs which are engaged in genuine work. NGOs which do not receive any foreign contribution for an entire year will not be required to submit a certificate rom chartered accountant with annual return. Earlier, all NGOs whether they received foreign unding or not were required to submit a certificate from the CA.The new rules do not require giv ing information regarding Facebook pages, Twitter handle and other personal details of the office bearer of the donorreceiver organisation. As per the new norms, declaration, undertaking in the application for registration, prior permission, renewal in annual returns have been simplified.

Source: http://epaperbeta.timesofindia.com/Article.aspx?eid=31816&articlexml=FCRA-Services-for-NGOs-Go-Online-15122015003014